Statement on 2016 Elections
GLMA President Jesse Joad and Executive Director Hector Vargas have released the following statement on November 10, 2016:

"Just two days ago, we witnessed the end of an unprecedented and extremely divisive election, one that has left many of us hurt, shocked and frankly wondering about the state of our nation and, in particular for GLMA, what this means for LGBT health equality. Like many others, we were extremely optimistic about the prospect of building on 8 years of steady and groundbreaking advances in LGBT health policy, much of which was accomplished under the provisions of the Affordable Care Act, which, in the words of former HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, represents the “strongest foundation we have ever created to begin closing LGBT health disparities.”

"While there may be open questions about what LGBT health policy will look like under the new presidential Administration that will take office in January, one thing is certain: GLMA is committed to doing all that we can to preserve the progress we’ve made and continue our policy, advocacy and education work to improve the health and well-being of LGBT people regardless of who sits in the White House. We must protect the gains we’ve seen and continue to press our broad policy priorities that include: further improving federal data collection efforts; ensuring nondiscrimination in healthcare delivery and access, and for LGBT health professionals; addressing the specific health needs and concerns of the transgender community; and promoting cultural competency training of health professionals of all disciplines and at all levels. Overall, our policy and education work will continue to be guided by the principle that science be the basis for policies impacting LGBT health.

"As important as continuing our policy and education work, GLMA, as an organization of LGBT healthcare providers and health professionals, must also turn its attention to helping heal the pain and division this election has caused. For those in the LGBT community, especially those who also identify as people of color, Muslim, immigrants, women, individuals with disabilities, and so many others, the rhetoric of this election has been extremely hurtful and fear-inducing. Without attention to this healing process, there is little we can do to move forward as a community or a nation.

"So together, we look ahead. We look ahead with uncertainty and anxiety about the challenges we will face in advancing LGBT health equity, but with resolve and determination because the health and lives of LGBT people depend on it."

 

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